Mindfulness-for-Parents-and-Kids_L

When we think of meditation, most of us get agitated at the prospect of being still, when we have so much to do all the time. We have preconceived notions about what a mindfulness practice actually is, that you have to be a grown-up to do it because kids don’t have the attention span.

However, scientists and educators have been continuously studying the art of meditation, how it can be adapted for different age groups and how it affects our outlook, sense of self, and even our physical health. Below are some fascinating facts about mindfulness practice and how we can easily institute a few minutes a day in order to self-regulate.

  1. Physical Health. Meditation can help treat high blood pressure, relieve stress, manage chronic pain, improve sleep and help with digestive issues.1
  1. Mental Health. Studies on a daily practice of mindfulness have shown that it can help people struggling with depression, anxiety, PTSD, substance abuse, and other disorders.
  1. Performance in the Classroom. Schools all over the nation are adopting mindfulness as part of their curriculum because they are seeing the benefits: better concentration, less outbursts, more engagement, and problem solving. Daniel Rechtschaffen is an educator who teaches meditation to children in at risk neighborhoods. He did a talk for Google explaining how and why it works: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1H8evVn-z2A&feature=share

Calm awareness is the optimal state for being and doing, and we all have it in us to cultivate this state with a little guidance. With practice, mindfulness can help us achieve balance in our homes and our work, and show our kids how to do the same.  

References:

  1. http://www.helpguide.org/harvard/benefits-of-mindfulness.htm