Susie Almaneih jewelbots-3In recent technology news, Jewelbots have been created as multi-functional friendship bracelets that teach girls how to code. Co-Founders Sarah Chipps, Brooke Moreland, and Maria Paula Saba designed these fashionable, yet tech-savvy bracelets in order to get more teen girls interested in coding.

All three founders share a similar interest in coding and technology and want to combine their interests as ways to promote a strong, positive image that associates females with technology starting from a young age. Sara Chipps is the co-founder and developer of Girl Develop It, a nonprofit company that shows women how to code. Brooke Moreland has a multitude of experience in high-tech fashion products and is also an entrepreneur, while Maria Paula Saba is a graduate of NYU’s ITP program, and now studies Bluetooth and Arduino as part of a post-doctorate fellowship program. Combining all three women’s intelligent efforts, they have created Jewelbots, a wearable, fashionable device far more inspiring than most of today’s wearable technology.

According to an article published on Wired.com:

“Compared to a gleaming Apple Watch or even an entry-level Fitbit, the Jewelbot hardware is primitive: a semi-translucent plastic flower charm that slides onto a hair tie-like elastic bracelet. The functionality is basic, too. The charms talk to each other over Bluetooth, and using a Jewelbots smartphone app, youngsters can program their charms to vibrate or light up when their friends are nearby,” (Vanhemert, Somehow Teen Girls Get the Coolest Wearable Out There).

Though their design is quite simple, the message behind the new Jewelbots is complex and powerful, especially for young girls. Now, a teenage girl can learn certain aspects of coding with her friends, in a fun, female-inspired way.

Today, an average of 74% of girls show an interest in the math and sciences in middle school, but only 0.4% go on to choose a college major in computer science. With more female-friendly technological initiatives starting at a young age, like the Jewelbots, many leading women in the world of technology hope to improve those statistics.

For more information about the latest Jewelbot trend and their impact on teen girls, please read Wired.com’s article here.